Journalism After Snowden

Journalism After Snowden
Research Project Description

Edward Snowden’s leak of classified documents on U.S. surveillance programs to Laura Poitras and Glenn Greenwald, and the subsequent reporting from the Guardian and partner institutions around the world has sparked an unprecedented public debate on digital privacy and the power of the state. It has also led to a debate over the role of journalism in democratic societies. Previous understandings and discussions of constitutional rights, shield law, institutional legitimacy, source protection, digital security, and the professional-amateur divide have all been thrown into disarray.

The Edward Snowden NSA surveillance revelations have chilled the international journalism community. At the core of the challenge presented lies a paradox – that the very tools that enable instant global communication and enable a much more open media ecosystem, also make journalists far more vulnerable to state surveillance. The implications of this include: the inability to protect sources, prosecution for adversarial reporting, and significant increased physical risk.

The Snowden story teaches us that the relationship between journalism and the state is an evolving one and requires regular deliberation and vigilance. This project seeks to spark a national debate by bringing both empirical data and analysis from globally respected journalists, editors and academics, to what is one of the most pressing question in contemporary journalism: what is the role of journalism in a surveillance state?

Journalism After Snowden, supported by The Tow Foundation and The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation is a yearlong series of events, research projects and writing from the Tow Center for Digital Journalism in collaboration with Columbia Journalism Review.

For questions about Journalism After Snowden, please contact Journalism After Snowden Research Director Jennifer Henrichsen:  jhtowcenter@gmail.com. For updates about #AfterSnowden, follow the Tow Center on Twitter @TowCenter.


Upcoming Events


Journalism After Snowden

A lecture with Dr. James Bamford
Finding and Protecting Intelligence Sources After Snowden

Tuesday, December 2, 2014
12:00 pm – 1:30 pm
Yale Law School – 127 Wall Street, New Haven, CT – Room 122

RSVP Required via Eventbrite

Dr. Bamford is one of the country’s leading writers on intelligence and national security issues.  His books include “The Puzzle Palace” and “Body of Secrets,” the only two books on the National Security Agency, and most recently “A Pretext for War: 9/11, Iraq and the Abuse of America’s Intelligence Agencies”.  Dr. Bamford has also written for many magazines including investigative cover stories for The New York Times Magazine, The Washington Post Magazine and The Los Angeles Times Magazine.  He also spent a decade as the Washington investigative producer for the ABC News program, World News Tonight with Peter Jennings, and taught at the University of California, Berkeley, as a distinguished visiting professor.

Space is limited and RSVP is required.

This lecture series is part of a book project titled Journalism After Snowden: The Future of Free Press in the Surveillance State, which will be published by Columbia University Press in the Fall of 2015.

The Tow Center for Digital Journalism and the Information Society Project of Yale Law School have partnered to present this series of 5 lectures as part of the larger Journalism After Snowden project this Fall.

Journalism After Snowden, supported by The Tow Foundation and The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation is a yearlong series of events, research projects and writing from the Tow Center for Digital Journalism in collaboration with Columbia Journalism Review.


Journalism After Snowden – In Defense of Leaks

A lecture with Jill Abramson
Wednesday, December 3, 2014
12:00 pm – 1:30 pm
Pulitzer Hall – 3rd Floor World Room

RSVP Required via Eventbrite

Jill Abramson is a journalist who spent the last 17 years in the most senior editorial positions at The New York Times, where she was the first woman to serve as Washington Bureau Chief, Managing Editor and Executive Editor. Before joining the Times, she spent nine years at The Wall Street Journal as the Deputy Washington Bureau Chief and an investigative reporter covering money and politics. She is currently a lecturer with the department of English at Harvard University.

Space is limited and RSVP is required.

This lecture series is part of a book project titled Journalism After Snowden: The Future of Free Press in the Surveillance State, which will be published by Columbia University Press in the Fall of 2015.

The Tow Center for Digital Journalism and the Information Society Project of Yale Law School have partnered to present this series of 5 lectures as part of the larger Journalism After Snowden project this Fall.

Journalism After Snowden, supported by The Tow Foundation and The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation is a yearlong series of events, research projects and writing from the Tow Center for Digital Journalism in collaboration with Columbia Journalism Review.


Past Events


 

Journalism After Snowden: Normalizing Surveillance | November 18, 2014

The default business model for the internet – free services and content supported by targeted advertising – has created a situation where internet users expect to be surveilled at all times by a complex web of large corporations.  In trying to produce digital public spheres that enable broad participation in debate and in making high quality news accessible to large audiences, we may have adopted a revenue model that normalizes surveillance to a point where it is invisible, inoffensive and simply accepted by most online users.  Does the normalization of commercial surveillance help explain the mixed reaction Americans have had towards revelations of widespread government surveillance by Snowden and other whistleblowers?

Ethan Zuckerman spoke on these issues and more in this lecture as part of the Tow Center for Digital Journalism’s Journalism After Snowden Research Initiative.

Journalism After Snowden, supported by The Tow Foundation and The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation is a yearlong series of events, research projects and writing from the Tow Center for Digital Journalism in collaboration with Columbia Journalism Review.

WATCH | Ethan Zuckerman’s lecture on Normalizing Surveillance
READ | Ethan Zuckerman’s Blog
MORE | MIT Media Lab

 


Journalism After Snowden: Investigative Reporting in a Time of Surveillance and Big Data | October 21, 2014 | #AfterSnowden

Dean Steve Coll spoke as part of the Tow Center for Digital Journalism and Yale ISP’s Fall Lecture Series as part of the Tow Center for Digital Journalism’s Journalism After Snowden research initiative.  The topic of the discussion, Investigative Reporting in a Time of Surveillance, was particularly salient as the lecture was held during Free Speech Week.  Dean Coll’s lecture coincided with the release of his article in The New Yorker, “How Edward Snowden Changed Journalism.”

READ | Steve Coll’s Article in The New Yorker
READ | Yale Holds Talk on Investigative Reporting in the Time of Surveillance – WNPR Connecticut
WATCH | Steve Coll’s Lecture – Investigative Reporting in a Time of Surveillance and Big Data


 

Journalism After Snowden: Source Protection – Rescuing a Privilege Under Attack | September 29, 2014

The first in the Fall series of events co-hosted by the Tow Center for Digital Journalism and Yale ISP featured David Schulz speaking on the legal and ethical issues facing journalists with regard to source protection.

READ | Jenn Henrichsen’s post for the Tow Center blog about the Event
WATCH | Video of the Event
SEE
| Photos from the Event
MORE | About David Schulz


 

Nourse Theater, San Francisco, Calif. | Purchase Tickets | Please note: This is a ticketed event; Tickets are $4.75 each

In April 2014, Greenwald and his colleagues at The Guardian received the Pulitzer Prize for Public Service.  Don’t miss Greenwald speak in-person as he fits all the pieces together, recounting his high-intensity eleven-day trip to Hong Kong, examining the broader implications of the surveillance detailed in his reporting, and revealing fresh information on the NSA’s unprecedented abuse of power with never-before-seen documents entrusted to him by Snowden himself.  Sponsored by: Haymarket Books, Center for Economic Research and Social Change, Glaser Progress Foundation, Tow Center for Digital Journalism – Columbia Journalism School.


Journalism After Snowden: A conversation about digital privacy, state surveillance, and the First Amendment rights of journalists | January 30, 2014

7:00 p.m. – 8:15 p.m.  Panel discussion
Roone Arledge Auditorium, Alfred Lerner Hall, Columbia University (115th Street at Broadway)
8:15 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. Reception
Columbia Journalism School

Snowden_event

Moderated by

Emily Bell
Director, Tow Center for Digital Journalism
Columbia Journalism School

with

Jill Abramson
Executive Editor, The New York Times

Janine Gibson
Editor-in-Chief, Guardian U.S.

David Schulz
Outside Counsel to The Guardian
Lecturer, Columbia Law School
Partner, Levine, Sullivan Koch & Schulz LLP

Cass Sunstein
Member, President Obama’s Review Group on Intelligence and Communications Technologies
Robert Walmsley University Professor, Harvard University

Read more:

The Huffington Post | NY Times’ Jill Abramson: Obama Crackdown Has Created ‘Freeze’ on Reporting | Jan. 31, 2014
TheWrap 
NY Times Editor Jill Abramson: Obama Crackdown on Leakers Threatens National Security Journalism | Jan. 31, 2014
Capital New York | Abramson: ‘Freeze’ setting in on national security beat | Jan. 31, 2014
Columbia Journalism Review | Reporting in the post-Snowden Era | Jan. 31, 2014
Capital New York | Media Pro: Wall-to-wall football; the rush to Oz | Jan. 31, 2014
Tow Center Live Blog |  Journalism After Snowden | Jan. 30, 2014